Tuesday, September 25, 2007

It's All in the Details: Greetings and Salutations


Cycling is a community in the sense that a big city like New York is a community. It’s a patchwork of very different groups of people who share only one thing in common, whose regard for each-other lies somewhere between indifference and disdain, and who acknowledge or help each-other only in times of emergency. Nonetheless, like any community, cycling has its own modes of social discourse. As such, it’s important to understand the niceties and not-so-niceties that cyclists engage in on a daily basis. The slightest gesture--and even the complete absense of a gesture--can speak volumes. And nowhere is this more apparent than in the way cyclists greet each-other.

Waving

Generally speaking, waving at other cyclists is optional. However, if you’re going to wave, there are certain times when it is appropriate, and other times when it is inappropriate. This also varies from discipline to discipline, and from circumstance to circumstance.

On the Road

If you’re going to wave on a road ride, remember that like waves at like. While it’s perfectly fine to wave at every bicycle you see, frankly, it’s a little strange—it’s like a puppy who joyously greets and slobbers on every person it meets, even the guy robbing its house. Instead, try waving at people who are riding in a manner similar to your own. If you’re out on your touring bike with a couple panniers full of granola and dry underwear, wave at other touring bikes. If you’re out on your road bike doing your best impression of a Euro pro, wave at other Euro faux-pros. And so forth. Remember—waving is like doing intervals. You can only do so many on a ride before you get depleted.

How To Wave On The Road

You’re on a bike, not a boat. So don’t go raising your hands above your head like you’re back from a week at sea and your family’s greeting you at the dock. Here are the three types of acceptable waves, in descending order of friendliness:

1) Hand removed from the bar, fingers extended;
2) Hand still holding the bar, fingers lifted briefly off the bar or brake hood.
3) The barely perceptible nod.

When Waving is Gratuitous or Inappropriate (for road riding and touring)

1) In the City

The onus to wave increases proportionately with your distance from an urban center. The further afield you are, the more warranted a wave is.

2) On a Climb

If you’re passing someone on a climb, refrain from waving, or at most just do a finger-lift. Giving a hearty wave—or, worse yet, engaging someone in conversation—on a climb can be insulting if the person is suffering much worse than you are. It’s like fanning yourself with hundred-dollar bills in front of a soup kitchen.

3) If You or Someone Else is Doing Something Stupid*

Recently I was riding in a bike lane and I encountered a cyclist coming at me head-on in the wrong direction. As we approached, he had the nerve to give a friendly nod. I do not encourage this kind of riding, but if you absolutely must do something like that due to extenuating circumstances, do not have the audacity to wave or nod to someone riding properly. Instead, hang your head in shame or make some vague gesture in an attempt to indicate you couldn’t help yourself. And if you’re the one in the right, do not greet or return a greeting from one of these riders. They are, for that moment, cycling pariahs.

*(You may also choose to show disapproval for someone’s appearance or equipment choice by withholding a greeting you might otherwise have proffered, or by failing to return one. This is known as the "passive insult." While petty and immature, it is nonetheless acceptable as your intent cannot be proven.)

Off-Road Greetings

Greeting fellow cyclists off-road is different than greeting them on pavement. Firstly, you’re not seeing them coming from miles away—you’re encountering them in close quarters and on terrain that may make it difficult or impractical for you to remove your hands from the bars. Secondly, the fact that you're not on the road and are instead in the wild means that you must be more forthcoming. It's a man-versus-nature scenario, so like a platoon in the jungle, you never know when you may need to band together in order to survive. You can't afford to go snubbing people.

The common mode of greeting off-road is to offer a verbal salutation, followed by information about how many riders are behind you. Even if the rider's appearance, bicycle, or lack of technical skill offends you, greet him or her anyway. As above, you may need him later if, say, you're attacked by a leopard or cheetah, or if you need to fashion some kind of crude booby-trap from his rear suspension in order to stall an attacking army.

In addition to this, it should be obvious that on a narrow trail you should yield the right-of-way to riders who are climbing. They need to keep momentum in order to continue, and if you force them to stop they may need to push their bikes to the top of the climb. And being forced to push your bike up a climb you otherwise would have cleared is like a combination of coitus interruptus and having to ride your beater bike because your friend borrowed your good bike and crashed it.

And while you generally shouldn't snub in the woods, you should still withhold a greeting if someone is doing something stupid, like riding the wrong way on a uni-directional trail. Additionally, you should let them know their mistake, or at least play chicken with them and force them off of it.

Commuting Greeting and Interaction

Unlike road riding, where urban greetings are unnecessary and where snubbing those unlike you is allowed, you should be more omnivorous in your greetings when you’re commuting. Yet it’s slightly strange to wave at other commuters while you’re actually riding. You're all just going to work. Do you wave at people when you're on the subway, or on the bus? As such, a good rule of thumb is to greet other commuters only when you’re stopped together at a light. A nod or a simple verbal greeting is appropriate here. However, there are certain things you should never, ever do when greeting another cyclist in traffic:

1) Ask How Much His or Her Bike Weighs

This is the most annoying question you can ask a cyclist. It’s the “Do you come here often?” of bike questions. No matter how pretty and shiny the bike is, don’t ask it.

2) Ask How Much His or Her Bike Costs

It’s mostly non-cyclists who ask this question, but it’s still worth mentioning. This is not the kind of thing you ask a stranger. Firstly, it’s personal—kind of like asking a strange woman her bra size. Secondly, cyclists only like to talk about how much their bikes or components cost in certain circumstances and with certain people. (This usually involves things like rationalizing how their incredibly expensive headset was actually a bargain since it will outlast a cheaper headset by a factor of five.) Otherwise, asking cyclists how much their bikes cost is like asking alcoholics how many drinks they've had. It only makes them angry and defensive.

3) Do Not Touch Someone’s Bike

Again, this is mostly something non-cyclists do, but just in case you’re tempted—do not touch.
4) Do Not Comment On Someone's Lack of a Helmet
Yes, it's better to wear a helmet than to not wear a helmet. But the fact that you know this and are wearing one does not entitle you to point it out to others. If you find yourself compelled to make comments like this to people, do your best to suppress the urge and instead simply go home and resume work on the life-sized marble statue you're carving of yourself to celebrate your own brilliance.

The Golden Rule of Cycling

Of course, the Golden Rule of Cycling that transcends any circumstance or discipline is that if you pass a cyclist who is having mechanical trouble, you must always ask if he or she needs help. However, there's also a loophole to this rule. If you don't want to actually stop, simply ride too fast to hear the reply. Acceptable reasons to do this include:

--You need to be somewhere and don't have time, but you don't want to look bad;
--You're on your way back from a long ride and you're really hungry;
--They've got the bike flipped upside-down to work on it and that irritates you;
--They're riding a road bike but are wearing a Camelbak;
--They've got the audacity to be riding a $6,000 road bike without a toolkit.
--So there you have it. It's not pretty, but neither is cycling.--

66 comments:

A complete waste of time said...

first

Steve said...

I find that when overtaking - either on a climb, on the flats, or on a descent - a simple finger-lift or kind comment ("nice bike!") goes a long way in mitigating the obvious: I have passed you, therefore I am your social/sexual/genetic superior.

And what do we call that instant when we cruise up behind someone and coast, with the annoyingly loud rasp of our own hub telling them simultaneously that we are both behind them and impatient to pass their sorry ass? The Germans must have a word for that, no?

Niki said...

Now how do you greet a cyclist you know when you are not on a bike? I've found I'm almost completely invisible to my friends if I'm not straddling a bike...

Dr. Logan said...

If they're on a $6,000 bike and stranded without a toolkit, I find the best course of action is to offer a trade. Your functioning beater or their broken (hence, useless to them) $6,000 bike. I've almost had some takers.

brocktice said...

Using the camelbak sure beats trying to sling 2L of water in various bottles around the frame.

quaffimodo said...

The Germans must have a word for that, no?

Kingenfreude.

Jim said...

Steve, that's what I call "Interval Training." I do about 10 miles of bike trail commute (each way) some days. Often, some Pathlete screws with me when I'm trying to do a light spin after a workout or going home. Usually they try to goad me into a race or pull off a dangerous pass, nearly hitting a woman with kids or some rollerblader or another cyclist. That's when I decide to do some operant conditioning.

So I settle in for an easy spin about 15 feet off the pathlete's wheel. Okay, sometimes I have to go to zone 2 against Hinault Jr. Then I start doing intervals.

Um, their intervals, not mine.

They usually pedal along until I get right up on their wheel, then coast. The profoundly loud clacking of a Powertap hub is the signal for them to ride at 200% of Functional Threshold Power for as long as they can. They throw down for all they are worth for about 20 seconds, I let them get a little gap, and then they pop. When they visibly deflate, I adjust speed appropriately and cruise for a couple minutes about 20 feet behind them. They're warmed up and ready to go now. I'm careful to spin quietly, and usually they are sure they've dropped me with that amazing jump. They get in a couple good minutes of rest, which is the most important part of any training plan. During their short rest is where I face the toughest choice of all:

What kind of intervals am I doing today?

If my Pathlete seems to be short on VO2Max ability, I do a Tabata protocol. That means every 20 seconds or so, I coast a little. The Pathlete takes off like a shot (from a very small gun) and pedals hard for 10 seconds, then rests, if by rest you mean "gasping for breath, bouncing around on the bike, looking around nervously." 20 seconds later, 'CLAK CLAK CLAK CLAK" causes him to stand up and do a little 10 second sprint. This is good because in addition to building supra-threshold power, anaerobic endurance, it will also increase aerobic base. Unfortunately, most Pathletes only have it in them to do about 4 or 5 reps before they are done for the day, and to get maximum value you need to do about 10 reps. Yeah, they just don't suffer very well. But I'm working on the local commuter community, so there's hope for them.

On the other hand, if I want to do some subthreshold intervals, I coast, then settle in about 7 feet off the Pathlete's wheel. He typically settles into a hard barely-subthreshold pace, bobbing shoulders and head, rocking side to side and all. After 4 or 5 minutes, depending on how I'm trying to work him out that day, I'll soft pedal and let him get 30 feet, signified by his turning around on the bike, swerving into the oncoming lane, and look of relief. If I think he needs to work on lactate clearance, he gets two minutes rest before CLAK CLAK CLAK CLAK. If he needs to really focus on steady power outpout, I'll let him rest for 4.5 - 5 minutes.

Man, I've never had so much fun doing intervals before. You should try it. At first I couldn't believe how consistently wannabe hammerhead commuters responded to this stimulus, but having seen it, I think I have found a new hobby. Man, they're easier to train than dogs.

Sure, some people might say it's mean. But if they want to race, they need to train right. They should be grateful as hell that I'm willing to help them out this way. Crap, I pay a lot of money every month for coaching, and my coach is *way* tougher on me than that.

Anonymous said...

A rejoiner to the last rule.

When on the side of the road working on your bike, and a fellow cyclist asks if you need help, the only acceptable answer is "No, I'm alright".
If you didn't think to pack the right gear, your self-imposed punishment is to walk your ass to the bus-stop, or call the significant other for a ride.

The only loopholes: Broken body parts. In which case, you may ask if someone will call 911. Once. ;)

dan said...

Funniest post yet.

jeremy said...

When is it acceptable to blast someone with water (or whatever might be in your bottle)? Adoring fans of bicycle racing seem to do it all the time. Some riders appear to enjoy it... Others look like the weight of their now wet jersey is all of the sudden a gigantic concern. Seems like this might be a greeting with more impact than a wave or a lack of a wave.

Anonymous said...

Jim,You have found your calling...
Subversive Pathlete Coach. I really enjoy pulling up behind a spandex clad roadie with my jeans and t-shirt on, clipped into my road rig, but looking the part of a commuter. I have yet to get dropped, and usually appreciate the pull. Is it downright rude to pull for a spandex clad pro-in-training" when you're wearing jeans???

Axel Bridges said...

Haha, Camelbak with a road bike. Nothing says "fish out of water" quite so clearly. It means one of two things: a roadie who's completely clueless, or a MTBer hacking it out on the road. If it's the former, they're a pariah and not stopping is justified. If it's the latter category (into which I personally fall), you know they've got tools, food, clothes, a gun, maybe a hibachi in there, so they definitely don't need help.

bikesgonewild said...

...i am printing these out & trying to paste them on the stems of appropriate bikes for instant reference...if you weren't so long winded, i wouldn't have to use the top tubes as well, dammit...

...as far as people asking the price of 'MY' ride...i just honestly tell folks that 'I' was in the industry & 'I' can't 'IMAGINE PAYING' nearly what 'YOU' would pay because 'MY CONTACTS' take care of 'ME'...i'm just a regular bike ridin' guy but 'I AM SPECIAL' that way...
...for some reason, i find that i subsequently waste less time having to wave to those same folks when i see them again...

A complete waste of time said...

bikesgonewild,

HAHAHAHAHAHA.....hilarious....just hilarious...

Steve said...

The other possible response to "Need help/everything ok?" is "Not really - know how to fix a flat?".

Saves me from getting my hands dirty.

The training principles outlined above would probably be enough to launch a complete coaching career. I'd almost pay for that kind of advice.

CATO said...

You left out a few important rules regarding fixed gear bikes.
1. When passing another fixed gear rider, you must not acknowledge his existence in any fashion, as you are way too hardcore to be seen being friendly. There are two exceptions to this rule. First, it is appropriate to do a short skip stop once you have passed the other rider to prove that you are indeed riding a fixed gear and not some lame singlespeed. Second, if you have a particularly small genital region, it is appropriate to land a long beautiful balls-to- the-stem swan skid to validate that not only are you riding a fixed gear, but you also have mad skilz and are not simply some rich suburban kid riding a fashion accessory.
2. When encountering the sub-species called "roadies," you may by no means make eye contact or even extend your fingers; rather, you must stare at their drive train as they pass by and give a noticible snarl to show your disapproval of their $3000.00 titanium cassette.
3. If you happen to be a "roadie" that encounters some trendy, white-belt wearing 19 year-old in pants so tight that they may split if he farts riding a beater roadbike blinged out with pink deep Vs, you must, of course, continue on as if he he doesn't exist. Even if the silly posuer can't be missed by his lime green chuck taylors or even if he waves at you, your species demands you stare ahead with a look of smug superiority. If you happen to encounter someone riding a fixed gear bike that you mistake for a fellow member of your elite weekend warrior club because he is wearing real cycling gear and happen to wave to him, you must turn your head, look at his drivetrain and roll your eyes with a "figures, another damn fixie rider too poor to afford a real bike" look.

Also, you forgot recumbents. If you happen to encounter a recumbent .......

well, its not a real bike anyways so none of these rules apply.

len said...

thanks mr snobby.

now i know why i've been getting all those death ray looks from the roadie pro model carbon bike as i enthusiastically wave while passing 'em on the uphill on my fixed 'cross rig.

pathlete! that is awesome!

Sean Lynch said...

CATO,

reccumbents are Human Powered Vehicles or HPV's for short.

HPV, like the virus that causes warts.

swade said...

Why no camelbacks while road biking? I would dispute this because 100 ounces of water seems practical no matter where you ride and I have no team car or domestique to bring me bottles. It just doesn't seem like a faux pas to me- then again, what do I know?

bricoleur said...

don't ask "is your bike fast?"

overtorqued_nut said...

This article is amazingly spot on. The cycling greeting hierarchy is a complex and daunting issue. Wouldn't it bee nice to make it even more difficult to understand?
I propose a nationwide standard of rock/paper/scissors matches between cyclists. Next time you pass a rider , make a fist and move it up and down 3 times using the normal "jerking off" motion. Proceed to make your hand signal selection. If they don't respond, then chase then down and inform them of the rules of the game.

Speaking of HPV's, here at CSU Chico we have a pretty successful human powered vehicle team, and being a college town, we have quite a bit of the other HPV.

len said...

swade:

for the same reason cyclist shave their legs.

Anonymous said...

Jim - TOO MUCH DETAIL. A comment doesn't have to be the next great American novel.

I love your blog Bike Snob, but some of your "regulars" appear to need your aproval.

Scott said...

"How many speeds does that bike have?" is another highly annoying one... it's like asking someone who works in IT if they buy a new computer every year, or thinking we're gurus on what printer to buy if we work in web administration...

bother yam said...

Don't forget not to ask about someone's Brooks saddle unless you ride one yourself. In that case, a polite "is it broken in?" is correct. If another person asks me, "Is that comfortable?" they're not gonna gonna be able to sit on ANY-bleepin'-THING after I'm done with 'em.

BikeSnobNYC said...

Len,

Well said.

Anonymous 4:21,

I like to think this site is a place where people can feel free to vent the cycling prejudices they're forced to suppress in polite cycling society. It's healthy and enlightening. Plus, Jim might kill a pathlete otherwise...

--BSNYC

Joe Camel said...

Just because 'they' say so, doesn't mean it's right...

"Wind tunnel testing has shown that when one rider has another cyclist drafting, it reduces the front riders effort by a small percentage. Same theory applies while wearing a hydration pack while riding a road bike." Something about reducing pressure? They suggest a camelback under your jersey. It will make you faster.

Hopefully fast enough that no one can see you!!!

mr.complaint said...

Hmmm.

Practice saying "Hello" to fellow cyclist, even though it's getting pretty crowded out there.

Also include the pedestrians that you see often. Even if their domestic animal is shitting on the pathway.

Always lift your hand off the bar when passing club racers and persons dressed as Hipsters on uphills. Regardless of bicycle variety. After all, it may be the only time you ever see them.

If you pass a guy who is yelling at a girl who is further down the hill to hurry up. Feel free to tell him to go and help her.

As for those with HPV, please go see a doctor. There is good help these days.

But when in a wind tunnel one need not wave at the camera. Even this wind tunnel.

James said...

Another suggestion on bike etiquette: I always waved at the homeless guys on mountain bikes along the bike path I used to commute to work.

When I had to work on saturdays, the same formula didn't work so hot with the weekend warriors on the same path. A commuter waving at them was met with more a look of horrified confusion.

Anonymous said...

do you wave to people on the subway or the bus?

I tried that once; "Hello I am Borat. Nice to meet you"

Anonymous said...

Jim-Bob beat his cheast and proudly proclaimed for all to hear
Steve, that's what I call "Interval Training." I do about 10 miles of bike trail commute (each way) some days. Often, some Pathlete screws with me when I'm trying to do a light spin after a workout or going home. Usually they try to goad me into a race or

Something about cooking vessels having a discord over coloring comes to mind.

Pompous windbag

The Great White Hype said...

Anon 6:18

"Something about cooking vessels having a discord over coloring comes to mind."

Something like this?
http://www.tshirthell.com/store/product.php?productid=812

Alex L said...

+1 for CATO. The skid salute is the quintessential fixed gear greeting.

Jim said...

Anonymous 4:21 - FU2. Better?

Jim said...

6:18 & 8:02 - you guys are so wrong. I'm actually a total dickhead. I only look like a pompous windbag if you read what I write. Hah. Fooled you. Dopes. Wanna race on the bike trail tomorrow?

len said...

you gotta check this out. the dangers of skid competitions in residential areas

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbzL0t-0aFs

Anonymous said...

Do I have to wave to her?

http://womenwhoride.typepad.com/susan/

CATO said...

No, just run for your life. Italian women are evil---that one looks just plain nuts!

Uncle Bob said...

When I'm commuting I don't wave, speak or even make eye-contact with other riders, any more than I do with fellow strap-hangers on public transport. I mean, you know how it is with commuters; you could drop dead on the platform and they'd only step round you to avoid the smelly derro stealing your shoes.

Mind you, I ride a folding bicycle, so I suspect even the recumbent riders feel superior, though the noise from my hub gears *does* make the guy in front look nervously over his shoulder as I coffee-grind up behind and pass him. No doubt Jim would overtake so fast he'd be red-shifted...

Anonymous said...

when will you guys learn that not a lot of fixie riders wear chucks!!??
infact none that i have encountered do. it's 2007, we generally wear slip-ons.
by the way the hpv comment is fucking stop on!

Anonymous said...

oops- spot on!

Anonymous said...

Axel Bridges said...
"Haha, Camelbak with a road bike. Nothing says "fish out of water" quite so clearly. It means one of two things: a roadie who's completely clueless"
I suppose Bobby Julich then falls into this "fish out of water/clueless" catogory fo wearing a camelback in the 2005 TdF team time trial. I guess he is just not as awesome as you.

Anonymous said...

On the flat, I only wave to women. On a climb... I nod, then yell loudly, "Burn, Baby Burn!" as I pass them.

Jim.. gotta keep those pathletes honest! Haha... i hate em!! Those days I want a slow ride in to admire the beauty of the morning is when some idiot wants to sprint to catch me and then draft. So I just start slowing... slowing, until they can't take it anymore and pass. Then I get up on their wheel and give them a bit... the dicks!

bikesgonewild said...

...anon 10:37pm...so ya spend a lotta time at that site, do ya huh ???...now THAT may be the scariest thing i've heard in a while...

Anonymous said...

bikesgonewild,

no, i spend most of my time at this site: http://www.shegotbike.com/

scroll down to the entry titled "a celebrity among us".

that's how i learned about the trek site.

still scared?

anon 10:37

Art said...

There are times when it's ok to not ask if someone fixing their bike on the roadside needs help. Like when you're at the back of a paceline that slows down to check things out and all ten guys in front of you have already asked if he needs help. Keep your mouth shut or prepare to duck a flying pump.

Anonymous said...

You need to add some rules.

Don't tell other riders off for stopping at a red light and thus blocking you from running through said red light.

Don't say hello to me or wave at me because I'm not your fucking friend just because we are both on bikes.

Jim said...

Anon 1:17 - that's my point. 95%+ of the riders on the path are cool, regardless of what style bike or type of riding they do. The other ones...

E.g.: commuting home yesterday, crowded 10 foot wide bike trail for the last 8 miles, three no-sleeve Tri-Pathletes riding downhill (oncoming) at a mid-20's pace, racing each other in the aero bars. All half-wheeled, they zig-zagged through a tight knot of strollers and slower moving bikes just up the path from me, weaving more or less down the center line. The lead Tri-Pathlete took his hands off the bars, turned around and was bitching out two girls on hybrids he'd just passed, strayed into my lane and just about hit me head on - I was guttered against a wall and didn't have anywhere to go.

Question: What would have been the appropriate greeting for the Tri-Pathletes?
A. Pompous gasbaggery
B. Humility - if you ride like a complete ass, who am I to judge?
C. Squirt Accellerade on them
D. Whacking the lead rider's handlebar good and hard as he passed dangerously close

Chazu said...

Jim,

Are you specifically referring to the CCT?

I made the mistake of riding there once this summer. A helmetless guy wearing a nylon "warmup suit" and ridng a folding bike went bananas in his efforts to keep pace with me (northbound). I slowed for an intersection, near the point where the CCT joins up with the G'twn Branch. (Wide, busy suburban road; I don't know the name)

Warmup Suit passed me as I slowed, and then feverishly looked over his sholder at me several times as I coasted toward the intersection. I said "come on, man, take it easy." At the light, he put his kickstand down, jumped off his bike, and started doing abdominal crunches at a feverish pace, right there on the pavement.

The lesson for me was to simply not ride on the CCT unless the average outdoor temp is in the 40's.

marlo said...

two things:

1. Saying that you've had the first comment is fucking retarded.

2. I choked on my tea at the marble statue bit. :)

Jim said...

>>>A helmetless guy wearing a nylon "warmup suit" and ridng a folding bike went bananas in his efforts to keep pace with me (northbound).

Holy cow, Chazu. Yep, CCT. I know exactly who you are talking about - wrote about getting "raced" and pwned by the guy here: http://unholyrouleur-jim.blogspot.com/2007/07/worst-bike-trail-guy-ever.html.

Few of the people on the CCT are morons, I have no beef with anybody (even recumbents), but the morons... Oh well, cold weather is coming, in a few weeks we'll only see the solid dedicated commuters and the racers out there; very few morons on the local trails after October 1. I realize I'm a huge ass for trying to screw with the nutjobs and for using them as blogfodder, but I got tired of them playing dumbass games in a mixed-use public thoroughfare and figured I'd dedicate my life to making fun of them, in person or in writing.

You eve

Gumbi said...

"The slightest gesture--and even the complete absense of a gesture--can speak volumes. And nowhere is this more apparent"

Ha! I found a typo! Not so perfect now are you bike snob!

gumbi said...

oh man, i'm dumb

hatten said...

"D. Whacking the lead rider's handlebar good and hard as he passed dangerously close"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGnLDr6jRSI

don't take yourself out in the process

hatten said...

len:
"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbzL0t-0aFs"

surprised the rider caught himself before breaking the fall w/ his face

bikesgonewild said...

...no worry, anon 8:42am...it was just a dig as i was taken aback when i opened the site...i won't say what i was maybe expecting...
...truth be told, i been on the wheel long enough that i basically applaud everyones two wheeled efforts...except, god, except for 'guys' who wear sleeveless jerseys w/ arm warmers...now that is seriously deranged...chicks can do it, it kinda looks cute, but dudes ???...jeez...

...anyway, i also stop at red lights & stop signs (A) for safety & consideration of others as well as myself, & (B) when i'm all flagged out in white sidi's 'n' fancy gear on a nice bike, the look i get reads, "well, he's into it & he's obeying the law, jeez, maybe they're not ALL idiots"

...by the same token, why, i've been known to occasionally nod to that old couple you'll see on bikes, the ones that could never even approach 'fred-dom'...just might be me some day...

Anonymous said...

bikesgonewild,

*I* was scared when I saw the photo of the woman with the trek madone she named "sweetness". I followed the link and discovered the trek site. (btw, i found the 'shegotbike' link via my bike club's listserv.)

yes, i really do spend too much time websurfing...

- anon 8:42am

Rick Cogley said...

In Japan, we just nod a little at each other. Great bike paths here in Kanagawa, along the rivers...

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