Tuesday, February 23, 2016

A Treatise On The Role Of The Bicycle In Modern Society And Stuff Like That

A wise man once said, "Politics politics politics politics politics!"

That man, of course, was Comicus the stand-up philosopher:


Yes, politics are very much in the air down here in Canada's mudflap as we prepare to "elect" our next president, former cycling promoter Donald Trump:



As we face this terrifying future it's only natural that some of us should choose to look backwards instead, as was the case with a reader by the name of Gregory, who tells me he came across this passage recently while reading "All the President's Men:"

"There was a pretty fair bike shop in McLean, and Bernstein drove there to kill a couple of hours and look halfheartedly for a replacement for his beloved Raleigh. [side note: Carl Bernstein's Raleigh was stolen from a DC parking garage the night of the Watergate indictments] But his mind was on Jeb Magruder. He had picked up a profoundly disturbing piece of information that day: Magruder was a bike freak. Bernstein had trouble swallowing the information that a bicycle nut could be a Watergate bugger. And Magruder really was a card-carrying bicycle freak who had even ridden his 10-speed to the White House every day."

Not having read the book (or been born at the time of the Watergate break-in for that matter) I didn't realize that such a strong Fredly narrative thread ran through the story, though I have seen the movie and now that I think of it I do remember that Bernstein (as played by Dustin Hoffman) kept his front wheel at his desk:



Indeed, between the bicycle wheel, the insouciantly floppy middle-parted hairdo, and his semitic nose for both news and justice, Bernstein (as played by Dustin Hoffman) very much informed my childhood image of the urban writer.  Certainly carrying your front wheel around seemed to me like a very cosmopolitan thing to do, and it was a notion I kept with me until years later I tried to bring my own front wheel into a Manhattan office building and they refused to let me into the elevator with it.

Anyway, it was certainly a more appealing journalistic image than that of Pete Hamill's loutish brother driving around Queens in his Plymouth Gran Fury and complaining about speed limits:


("Derp derp duy I used to play stickball derp derp derp.")

Putz.

By the way, it would appear that back in the 1970s Dustin Hoffman was also scoring smugness points off the screen, because here he is child-schlepping in Manhattan:


I realize it's typical to be overly nostalgic for the decade for one's birth, but I can't help thinking that during my lifetime we've completely surrendered to the neurotic car-centric illusion of safety, and it's depressing to imagine the media shitstorm that this sort of helmetless celebrity cycling would precipitate today.

Then again for all I know it's just a publicity shot and the guy never schlepped a kid in his life, what the hell do I know?

Nevertheless, you can tell a great deal about a culture by looking at its relationship (or lack thererof) with the bicycle. For example, Americans are selfish, spoiled, SUV-driving consumers.  Australians are selfish, spoiled, SUV-driving consumers with funny accents.  And so on.

Furthermore, the bicycle can also be a powerful instrument of social change.  Consider for example the role it once played in the struggle for women's rights:

The craze was meaningful, especially, for women. Both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are credited with declaring that "woman is riding to suffrage on the bicycle," a line that was printed and reprinted in newspapers at the turn of the century. The bicycle took "old-fashioned, slow-going notions of the gentler sex," as The Courier (Nebraska) reported in 1895, and replaced them with "some new woman, mounted on her steed of steel." And it gave women a new level of transportation independence that perplexed newspaper columnists across the country.

Not that you'd know it today:


Still, it's both inspiring and humbling to see that the bicycle is still playing this role in other cultures:


Amna Suleiman and her friend Asala taking a break from cycling in the northern Gaza Strip on Friday. They are among the first women in years to pedal publicly in Gaza, where an unwritten rule bars women past puberty from cycling. 

Sadly we also have an unwritten rule here in America that you don't ride a bicycle past puberty regardless of gender, but in our case it's not about gender oppression, it's just simple laziness.

And while relatively expensive hybrid bicycles gather dust in suburban garages as we squander our hard-won liberty, cycling in Gaza is an act of defiance:

“The role of our women is to obey their husbands and prepare food for them inside the house, not to imitate men and ride bikes in the streets,” said the man, 33, who refused to give his name but echoed the view of many Gaza men interviewed, and of multiple comments on social networks, after news of the cycling group reached the Palestinian news media.

One can assume that the above-quoted man A) is single; and B) refused to give his name out of fear that his mother would punish him for his impudence by refusing to cook dinner for him.

Of course, while it's important to recognize that our own culture is spoiled and coddled, it's also worth noting that this recognition can collapse under its own weight in a sort of smugness meltdown, as evidenced by the existence of this guy:


See, you're just a stupid consumer, whereas he's a guy with integrity who made money in tech and now lives in the vicinity of Boulder, a place known around the world for being totally down to earth:

Gradually, he divulged more, as he warmed to the persona and to the admiration of the masses. Now his adherents know that he lives in Longmont, Colorado, a half hour northeast of Boulder—a Mustachian paradise. The town was founded by Chicagoans in 1871 as an agricultural utopia, and later thrived on the production of sugar beets. The heart of it is a grid of compact but stately homes with trees on small lots. In the past several years, a tech-based Boulder boom has spread to Longmont, lifting prices and reviving a once moribund downtown. I heard Boulderites refer to it as “Methmont,” but now it’s a craft-brew town, full of gut jobs and fixer-uppers, which Mr. Money Mustache often finds himself working on—for fulfillment, of course, since he doesn’t need money. He gets around town on foot or by bike. He uses his car only when he has to haul a load of more than a hundred pounds. He and his wife burn just two and half tanks of gas a year.

That's still two and a half tanks of gas more than like 50% of New Yorkers.


("Yep.")

He also pays his son to ride his bicycle:

Adeney pays Simon ten cents for every mile he rides on his bicycle. So far, Simon had logged thirteen hundred miles. Simi’s father, to their dismay, also sometimes gives Simon money. Now the boy had seven hundred dollars, which he had deposited in the Bank of Mr. Money Mustache, at an annual interest rate of ten per cent. With regard to college, Adeney said, “I would rather Simon find a way to pay for it himself.”

I get the not paying for college thing, but if he wants to teach his son self-sufficiency then I don't think anything could be more at odds with that lesson than paying him to ride his bicycle.  Getting paid to ride a bike is a pipe dream that has derailed countless young lives.  How many more people need to be seduced by the sordid worlds of bike messengering and racing before somebody makes some kind of PSA?

You might as well pay your kid to do bong hits.

Anyway, if you're thinking this level of smugness couldn't possibly be homegrown, you're right, because he's Canadian:

He was reared in Caledonia, Ontario, a town of ten thousand about thirty minutes from Hamilton. Adeney remembers a complete absence of foreign automobiles, and no cable TV at home. His mother, Jane, was a schoolteacher and an artist who became a stay-at-home mom. His father, David, worked at an advertising firm that refused to do ads for alcohol or tobacco. “I did not approve of excess,” David told me. David and Jane divorced when Peter was fifteen.

"A complete absence of foreign automobiles?"  Is there even such a thing as a Canadian car?

By now you may suspect that this guy is basically the world's most successful stoner, and of course you'd be right:


In the days I spent with him, we went for a few hikes, visited a puzzle factory, ran errands, had meals, hung around the house. “I operate like a stoner, because I kind of am one,” he told me. One evening, he walked down to the marijuana dispensary. “It’s a retirement drug,” he said. He calls his vaporizer pen “my health stick.” He said that thirty dollars of sativa oil lasts him half a year. It was time for a reload.

Sounds like the miracle of Hanukkah, only with THC.

85 comments:

babble on said...

Hello!!

Ted K. said...

118. Conservatives and some others advocate more “local autonomy.” Local communities once did have autonomy, but such autonomy becomes less and less possible as local communities become more enmeshed with and dependent on large-scale systems like public utilities, computer networks, highway systems, the mass communications media, the modern health care system. Also operating against autonomy is the fact that technology applied in one location often affects people at other locations far way. Thus pesticide or chemical use near a creek may contaminate the water supply hundreds of miles downstream, and the greenhouse effect affects the whole world.

Dorothy Rabinowitz said...

Panties!

Tom Morley said...

Wow.

ricochet said...

mmmbob

Anonymous said...

je suis dans le premier dix.

N/A said...

Non-plussed bibshorts guy looks pretty snappy in a suit.

Two Claws said...

Two claws up!

Anonymous said...

That man wanted to touch my peepee.

N/A said...

I coalesce the vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful comprehension.

mikeweb said...

Funny, I read both the Gaza cycling piece and the Mr. Moustache money article earlier today.

I don't have a man-crush on Dustin Hoffman though.

mikeweb said...

And Babs ftw!!

streepo said...

scranus

Jiroemon Kimura[ said...

"...or been born at the time of the Watergate break-in for that matter..."

You, sir, are a whipper snapper.

Anonymous said...

Toppus XX

Jiroemon Kimura[ said...

Also...

Good One, Snob!

P. Bateman said...

damn it - no podium! i shake my fists at you. i fist you!!!

Dorothy Rabinowitz said...

Mr. Money Mustache I would like you to meet Madame Money Merkin.

dancesonpedals said...

Congrats to the two ladies on the podium (a Ted K sandwich).

I'd like to say that the artisanal man & woman on the bike are demonstrating the congress* of the cow, but they're not. More like a bike sandwich.


*things were gerrymandered.

Bryan said...

But, Hoffman is "an excellent driver" and knows the best places, and store locations, to buy boxers.

P. Bateman said...

who doesn't love a lady with a vacuum in hand?

KAW said...

"I heard Boulderites refer to it as 'Methmont'"

That, "Longtucky", "The opposite of Boulder", and "Fuck you, Google, why couldn't you bring Fiber to Denver instead?" are all acceptable answers.

Dooth said...

Why must "bike" and "freak" be juxtaposed? This must end now.
And how does a man know the role of a woman? If he doesn't even know himself...

I'm exploring an independent run for president.

crosspalms said...

Visited a puzzle factory in an agricultural utopia founded by Chicagoans? That sativa oil must be good stuff. Think I'll stick with the lard, though. Or lardo.

Schisthead said...

Did you tell the people at the unemployment office that you didn't bullshit last week, but that you TRIED to bullshit last week?

balls™ said...

69


I was born in 1969, so I guess I was around at the time of the original 'Gate scandal. If only Bengazi were a gated community, perhaps those idiots could get someone to pay attention to their BS scandal. It's not like someone got a blowjob while selling arms to Iran or something.

Boring.

69!

Anonymous said...

Canadian automobiles

Freddy Murcks said...

I have to admit I am kinda jealous of Mr. Money Mustache. I'd love to be able to not work, live comfortably, ride my bike as much as I want to, and wander around in a stoned haze the majority of the time. He's a bit twee, but I find him much less annoying than, for instance, those stupid neo-Victorians in Washington.

janinedm said...

Do you think there's a correlation in the change in sentiment to the relative safety of cars? In the 70s, air bags were optional when available as were seat belts, there was no crumple protection or safety glass, etc. etc. etc.Not to mention no wifi and smart phones. So maybe they didn't have a sense of aloof, self centered, nearly absolute security that frees one mentally to drive like an asshole. There's no danger for them, so they can't even tell that they're behaving generously. Nowadays, you literally have to stop your car on train tracks and leave it there to not survive an accident. In the 70s, dickish behavior could get you a face full of metal steering wheel, twisted metal, and non-safety glass.

wle said...

surprised snob spurns mustachianism..
wle

dancesonpedals said...

"So maybe they didn't have a sense of aloof, self centered, nearly absolute security that frees one mentally to drive like an asshole"

I recall a character in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil who would drive down the interstate while watching TV and doing her nails. It was always possible to be an aloof asshole, but technology helps.

babble on said...

OMG. You, my dear Janine, are one clever cookie. Yes yes yes you hammered that nail right smack dab on the head. It simply must be absolutely, unequivocably true, that the added safety features of todays cars contributed to the ONE MILLION car inflicted fatalities that occurred on the planet's roads last year. If an healment makes a cyclist take more risks, just square that factor when you box a motorist into a protective little cage and then distract them with onboard internet access!

Anonymous said...

Mr Money Mustache may be a stoner however he is a very successful stoner. He doesn't have to schlep to a job everyday. He can just ride if he damn well pleases.

That sounds pretty good to me.

Anonymous said...

And the cat came back,
The very next day.
The cat came back
They thought he was a goner
But the cat came back,
Just couldn't stay away.

Anonymous said...

Wondering if you saw this "accident" in NC:

http://www.newsobserver.com/news/traffic/article61647312.html
http://abc11.com/news/cyclists-in-hospital-after-being-hit-by-car-in-angier/1209921/
http://www.wral.com/four-pedestrians-struck-by-vehicle-in-johnston-county-/15398255/
http://www.wral.com/cyclist-injured-in-angier-crash-questions-how-accident-happened-/15404137/

N/A said...

Mr. Money Mustache is a bullshit artist, as well. The theme of today's post, bullshit artists.

P. Bateman said...

its not just the safety features, it is the overall build quality of modern cars and the improved tires. you just dont FEEL like your are going all that fast in a modern car which makes them boring to drive and dangerous especially since they seem to cater to people who dont know how to drive - self parking, self steering, auto braking, back up cameras...

couple that with the massive gains in horsepower in the past 10 years and you have a pretty solid recipe for disaster.

any asshat with little understanding of driving can pilot a big heavy powerful fast car that would barely register a "blip" when they hit you because that suspension is so good at sorting out the bumps.

god i hate modern cars.

i still feel that requiring EVERYONE to learn to drive a manual before getting a license would at least help a bit. that actually requires paying some attention to what you are doing.



NourskSiklist said...

Teh Snob's child schlepper gets 4 points on the Smugometer. It only goes to 8, unlike other, selfish gauges. One point was donated to a poorer scale which needed it more, and the other has been saved for future generations. Be grateful, and pass it on.

On the other hand, Mr. Money Mousse-stash breaks the scale completely, shedding his human chrysalis to emerge as a cosmic superbeing, joined by his only worthy companion; Man Who Only Owns 15 Things.

NUDE CIPO

Frickus Rungus said...

PB,

If everyone drove a car with a manual transmission, then ALL parked cars would rise up and smite pedestrians on the sidewalk... Haven't you been paying attention?!?

Anonymous said...

I'm surprised Snob writes MMM off as stoner smuggness. Both blogs are favorites of mine and simarly skewer the excesses and laziness of our culture. Mr Money Mustache didn't get rich with a tech job. He got rich by not buying bullshit. Something I'm sure Snob has touched on.

Lynyrd Skynyrd said...

Now Watergate does not bother me, does your conscience bother you?

BikeSnobNYC said...

Anonymous 3:15pm,

Not "writing it off" or anything. I'm just amazed at how much mileage people get out of not driving a lot or having a clothes dryer in their single-family house.

Only in A-meh-rica.

--Wildcat Etc.

N/A said...

... also his dope smoking.

Hard to take serious.

Serial Retrogrouch said...

...is it already Wednesday?

janinedm said...

Not for nothing, I have a hard time to believing that he retired by 30 by not buying bullshit. I mean, I can buy that he doesn't lead a wasteful life, but I have a strong suspicion that he may have graduated from the Gwyneth Paltrow College of the Donald Trump school of self made success. It is cool that he did not fritter away what he obviously started out with, but "cut back on the Subarus and microbrews" rings sort of hollow and out of touch to me. He's not the devil or anything, but he's pretty smug about his home run for having started on third base. And I say that as someone lives laughably below my means (except booze and skin care: I make too much money for blended scotch or bargain overnight moisturizer). I guess I'm cool with it as long as he points his scorn at people who take too many ski trips rather than the nice people in my building, who are largely broke or near-broke and not wasting money as far as I can see.

BamaPhred said...

Wasn't Comicus the Stand Up Philosopher categorized as "bullshit artist" when he applied for unemployment? Or do I have the wrong one?

The captcha asked me to select grass, but I didn't see any, but I checked the lawns and it let me pass. Seeing as how the subject is stoners and all.

DB said...

Good one, janinedm.

recumbent conspiracy theorist said...

Scranus.

Jobst Brandt said...

And the bicycle wheel in the movie still? Note it is a proper wheel with 36 spokes.

BikeSnobNYC said...

janinedm,

Well said.

I had a hard time relating to the home-schooling and the haggling over the $20 for so his kid could go to the pizza party or whatever it was. That seemed less like rejecting consumerism and banality and more like the way ultra-orthodox religious groups isolate themselves because the rest of the world is "unclean."

--Wildcat Rock Machine

Mean Mr. Mustard said...

Also, let's not forget that Boulder is the trust fund baby capitol of the world with considerable gravitational mass pulling more in. Longmont is simply a sattelite attractor for those who got in later.

Mean Mr. Mustard said...

It's a slippery slope Mr. Snob. Like all orthodoxies. The camel's nose in the tent and all that other "wisdom".

BTW, if you haven't been thrummed about it already by publishing promoters - a new book about bicycles as the Mexican border-breaching conveyance of choice "The Coyote's Bicycle" looks to be an interesting read. I have no association. I just thought of you when I read a review of the book.

bad boy of the north said...

Just a minor historical footnote moment for moi.back in late 60s,we went to DC to visit family there.i was a wee bit of a lad then.anyway.we stayed at the HoJos across from the,then,under construction,watergate.Hojos,for the unitiated,was an earlier chain of ice cream and typical american fare restaurants,that also opened roadside motels.it had a rooftop swimming pool that had closed circuit tv,so mommy and daddy can keep an eye out.
If i'm not mistaken,said HoJos motel figured prominently in the watergate break-in.i think bicycle freak,would be todays fred.correct me if i'm wrong.....on either account.

bad boy of the north said...

Snob,as someone said earlier,you whipper snapper,thanks for inciting a cranial rolodex flashback.

Bill Lindeke said...

OK, he's a bit of a tool, but his 2013 takedown, "Curing Your Clown Car Habit" (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/04/22/curing-your-clown-like-car-habit/) is one of the best things ever written about idiots driving cars.

Will Frazier said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lieutenant Oblivious said...

Well as an alter cocker born in the late 50's, who was in middle school at the time of the Watergate break-in, let me tell all you young whipper snappers that seat belts, padded dashboards, steering wheels with padded centers instead of chest piercing chrome spearheads, collapseable steering columns instead of solid ones to better spear the driver with and lots of other things that seem like they've been in cars forever, started with Title 49 of the United States Code, Chapter 301, Motor Vehicle Safety Standard, which took effect on January 1, 1968. All this was needed, but came about largely due to some guy named Ralph Nader made a name for himself by discrediting the Chevy Corvair and its manufacturer, General Motors, who thought it would be a good idea to have private investigators tail Nader and dig into his personal life to discredit him rather that address the car's issues. In typical GM fashion, they ultimately addressed the problems, but then killed the car anyway.

crosspalms said...

bad boy of the north
My main memory of HoJos is the salt-water taffy

dancesonpedals said...

Screw the HoJo's Taffy, get the clam roll.

Anonymous said...

Well, to fuck with Peter Adeney and his hardly any gallon of gas life because when I went to work today I drove my made in Mexico Ford due to the fact I have the flu and at work I didn't even have time to go get any medicine to deal with my fever.

Anonymous said...

Hey Snob, Did you have any part of this? You said you were going to take your lobsters there?
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/fight-conn-chuck-e-cheese-caught-video-article-1.2541500

Snob's Rabbi said...

So, a little sensitive, are we Mr. Trayf?

Anonymous said...

This deserves an honourable mention too:
Afghanistan’s women’s national cycling team nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize

Dooth said...

Ok, so my presidential exploratory committee just gave me some sobering news...I have only two cases of empty beer bottles to fund my campaign. But all is not lost! Baseball season is just around the corner.

Anonymous said...

Podium kisses for Babble!

Very Slim Pickins said...

"mounted on her steed of steel." As Mr. Smith, on Lost in Space, used to say "Indeed".

bad boy of the north said...

wow,ms.babble!right on top.....congrats.salt water taffy,crosspalms?i thought that was reserved for atlantic city.

bad boy of the north said...

I hope she's okay.

bad boy of the north said...

your mom.

dancesonpedals said...

All the corvair needed was a suspension upgrade.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Money Mustache is the Bike Snob of personal finance, there's no getting around it.

leroy said...

Years and years ago, when I was young, I spent a couple of months at the Watergate Hotel for work. Everyone was perfectly nice, but I never got used to it. One evening, I tossed and turned so much in a bed so big that when I woke up, I was stuck under the covers sideways, parallel to the headboard, with no idea where I was or how to get out. (My dog claims I could have been famous for not breaking out of the Watergate.)

There was a tiny health club in the basement whose most prominent piece of equipment was a tanning booth with little white plastic goggles for the eyes. In the basement, there was also a tiny restaurant, Jean-Louis, run by chef Jean-Louis Palladino, that was amazing.

I don't miss any of it, but it would be nice if Jean-Louis were still around.

leroy said...

Palladin. Jean-Louis Palladin. What was I thinking.

More like "rife with pretentiousness" said...

"I’ll be the first to admit it: Mr. Money Mustache is known to indulge in a few luxuries. Hell, I’m doing it right now, with my fingers tapping comfortably on a brushed aluminum keyboard while the letters instantly pop up on the 1920×1080 pixel screen of this feathery “ultrabook” laptop."

"I’m on the front porch of my luxury house,"

"When you really look at this fancy picture, I’m sitting around on my ass, consuming stuff."

"the luxury home is tying up close to half a million dollars of precious capital."

"In fact, the relatively material-rich lifestyle of the MMM family is one of the primary reasons this blog doesn’t scare everyone off. People say, “Oh yeah, they have a kid, cars, and a nice house – seems like a reasonable lifestyle, I guess we can dip our toes in as well.” For a blog that preaches living a larger life with a smaller footprint, the contradictions are rife."

"Fortunately, there is a way to reconcile the ideal and the reality. You can dabble in luxury, without becoming a whining slave to it, just by understanding the concept that luxury is a drug."

"Most of us have tried drugs in one form or another, right? Coffee gives you a little boost. Alcohol makes you a bit more silly and friendly. Ibuprofen lowers your swelling and fever and can really cut down the misery of a cold or flu. Marijuana is amazing for bringing out creative ideas and highlighting the texture and humor in life, and the list goes on. But the key to all drugs is that they come with a balance of positive and negative effects. So only a fool would overdose on any of them in a breathless pursuit of their positives, while ignoring the well-documented negatives.

"Luxury behaves in exactly the same way. I remember taking a big hit of it on a business trip a while back. I stepped off the plane in an exotic destination and smelled the warm air off the sea as I watched the palm trees and flowers blowing in the wind. A black Lincoln was waiting right at the curb to pick me up. I threw my backpack into the back seat and climbed in, noting the contrast between my sandals and shorts and the black leather seats of this business-oriented car. The driver zoomed me through the city to the luxury hotel while I casually flicked through emails on my phone and watched the skyscrapers roll past."

“I am Mr. Bigshot”, I thought to myself. “I sit in bigass cars, with muscular V-8 engines which waste huge amounts of gas while people drive me around. THIS is the treatment I deserve! Why have I been taking the bus and riding my bike and setting up tents all these years?”

Anonymous said...

The quote by that guy about "...the role of our women is to obey their husbands and prepare food for them inside the house ...", the sad part is- he probably is not single at all but well and truly married.

Anonymous said...

Just a short list of all the "local green: companies that MMM likes: Chase, Amazon, Geico, King Souper, and a few sorta cool companies like Bike Nashbar, REI, Costco,.....

McFly said...

That minivan has obviously not seen any kid action. It's clean as fuck.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Money Mustache gave a brief rundown of his history in one of his blogs. If you add-up the time in university, his very short working career, and the quick step to lifelong financial freedom and a paid-off house, the numbers don't add-up at all. There was clearly an inheritance or other windfall that he neglects to mention.

He is a great advocate of using a bike for transportation and errands though, and one of the few personal finance writers to do so. I commend him for that.

Two Claws said...

dancesonpedals -

here's your suspension upgrade:

https://flic.kr/p/6iJw8s

Lieutenant Oblivious said...

DOP @ 9:10 PM yesterday -

You're right and GM had already done that for the 1964 model year before Nader's Unsafe at Any Speed was published in 1965. There was also some minor nuisance with exhaust gas from the heater boxes infiltrating the car interior but hey, it's an air cooled car!

dcee604 said...

While there's no Canadian car, many cars are built in Ontario, Canada, such as the Toyota Corollas, RAV4's, and Dodge Caravans.

dop said...

In 1966 we had a Chrysler convertible identical to the one Ray Liotta drove in Goodfellas. My brother backed it out of our driveway, & wedged the right rear corner of the car through a corvair coming up the road. The front half (trunk) of the corvair was crumpled around our car's bumper. The yellow tank didn't have a scratch.

Thad White said...

Love the Mr. Porter ad retargeted on the NYT article. If you like Mr. Porter, check out Frank and Oak. It's a Canadian shop, which means great prices given the US/Canadian exchange rate right now.

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